Burning the Candle at Both Ends – Photo Illustration

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Burning the Candle at Both Ends – Photo Illustration

Burning the Candle at Both Ends

Burning the Candle at Both Ends.

We all do it. We push ourselves to extremes – meeting deadlines for clients, juggling multiple jobs, writing papers for teachers, studying for exams – often working into the wee hours of the night, getting little to no sleep. It’s a viscous cycle that can have devastating effects on our well-being. Take a deep breath… and relax.

 

I created this image with my friend’s daughter, Jenna, whose dress, expression, posing and newly-dyed hair were perfect! Thanks Jenna!

I’m grateful to the North Haven Camera Club for this month’s “candle” assignment. I probably would never have come up with this image if I didn’t have a prompt AND a deadline!
I’m finding that I tend to work backwards as an artist. Most artists have concepts first that they develop into works of art.
I had no intention of creating an image about excessive work and little sleep, but now it’s an inspiration for me to keep exploring this topic.

Here are some definitions of the idiom “Burning the Candle at Both Ends” from: thefreedictionary.com.

burn the candle at both ends

Fig. to work very hard and stay up very late at night. (One end of the candle is work done in the daylight, and the other end is work done at night.) No wonder Mary is ill. She has been burning the candle at both ends for a long time. You’ll wear out if you keep burning the candle at both ends.

burn the candle at both ends

to regularly stay awake late and get up early because you are too busy I’m busy trying to get ready for the holidays and burning the candle at both ends.

burn the candle at both ends

to get little sleep or rest because you are busy until late every night and you get up early every morning (usually in continuous tenses) She’d been burning the candle at both ends studying for her exams and made herself ill.

burn the candle at both ends

Exhaust one’s energies or resources by leading a hectic life. For example, Joseph’s been burning the candle at both ends for weeks, working two jobs during the week and a third on weekends . This metaphor originated in France and was translated into English in Randle Cotgrave’s Dictionary (1611), where it referred to dissipating one’s wealth. It soon acquired its present broader meaning.

burn the candle at both ends

Extreme effort without time to rest. The phrase, which came originally from a French expression, came to mean working so hard that you burn yourself out. In addition, because candles were once an expensive item, to burn one at both ends implied wasting valuable resources to achieve an obsession. The poet Edna St. Vincent Millay used the image in her verse: My candle burns at both ends; It will not last the night; But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends— It gives a lovely light.

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